Valente Seminar for Fall 2012

I’m excited to be a part of this project next semester, and to be co-facilitating this with so many other interesting Bentley faculty.

Answers to Frequently Asked Questions

The nature of the course: All four professors and all enrolled students are in the room at the same time, and all participants take equal responsibility for the conversation.  Small groups of students will be expected to initiate the discussion a couple of times during the semester by coming up with some opening questions on the reading, but – by design – no one will be teaching the course; the point of the seminar is for all participants, students and faculty alike, to learn from the readings and from each other. There are no exams, but each participant will be expected to write a short paper during the term and a major paper on some aspect of the course subject at its conclusion.

Registration Requirements and Course Credit Issues: Once notified that you have been accepted into the seminar, you will need to register for the Interdisciplinary Studies course ID 401. All Bentley undergraduates, honors and non-honors, LSM and non-LSM, are welcome to enroll in the course. The course can count for Honors credit. The course cannot count as an Honors capstone course. All directed studies courses may only be taken as elective courses, so students will not be able to count this course toward their major. To apply this course toward your LSM, you will need to ask permission from the LSM Director, David Curley (dcurley@bentley.edu). With the permission of the appropriate advisor(s), the final seminar paper can serve as a “first draft” of LSM culminating experience. To register for a directed studies course such as this one, you must have a GPA of at least 3.0.

Course Completion Requirements: To receive credit for the seminar you must:

  1. Prepare for and attend all seminar meetings.
  2. Complete a final essay of 15pp. or more (requirements determined by instructor).
  3. Attend at least two Valente Center events (workshops, lectures, seminars) during the semester.

“New” Media CFP

Critical Perspectives on Global-Local Tensions in New Media

This anthology seeks to add to emerging scholarship on new media industries, policy, global/local tensions in media firms, and global/local experiences of new media technologies, services, and products. While there is a wealth of scholarship that approaches these questions in relation to advertising, film, and television, much more needs to be said about the cultural and material practices of new media, especially given that new media production and reception often cannot be theorized in the same local/national terms in which creative practices in the film, television, and advertising industries have been analyzed.  We seek papers with prose and diction appropriate for the undergraduate classroom but that are also sophisticated enough to be read by beginning graduate students. Despite this project’s basis in the English language, we are interested in incorporating authorial voices and topics from a variety of national, regional, and subnational perspectives.

We are currently seeking papers to increase the global coverage of the collection.  We are interested in proposals that address intersections between the global and the local in “new” and/or emerging media forms and practices in:

-       Eastern Europe

-       Location-based services outside the U.S.

-       Latin America, especially Brazil

-       North Africa and/or the Middle East

-       West, East, or sub-Saharan Africa

Please send a 250-word abstract with a preliminary bibliography to either Ben Aslinger (Bentley University, Waltham, MA, USA, baslinger@bentley.edu) or Germaine Halegoua (University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA, grhalegoua@gmail.com).   Our plan is for all 5000-word commissioned papers to be due by March 31, 2011.

CFP Extended to 9/7: Global-Local Tensions in New Media

This anthology seeks to add to scholarship on the cultural geography of new media networks and products and the tensions between the “global” and the “local” by examining a range of new media case studies. This project considers new media practices, texts, services, software, policies, infrastructures, and design discourses that enrich existing relationships between creative industries and cultures of production, reception, and engagement.

We seek papers with prose and diction appropriate for the undergraduate classroom but that are also sophisticated enough to be read by beginning graduate students.  While we are open to case studies that illuminate new commercial and sociocultural practices and debates in any national context, we are particularly interested in papers that examine intersections of the global and the local outside of Western Europe and the industrializing nations of the Asia-Pacific region.  Despite this project’s basis in the English language, we are interested in incorporating authorial voices and topics from a variety of national, regional, and subnational perspectives.

We seek papers that address one or more of the following subject areas:

analog and digital media forms in the global market

the role of new media in constructing “media capitals”

the role of new media platforms in addressing diasporic audiences

challenges of defining the local in the face of complex intersections with the global

debates surrounding media globalization in specific local contexts

the construction of dominant models of web design and definitions of “quality” web aesthetics

vernacular design aesthetics that resist hegemonic these models

cultural policy and new media industries

global/local visions of the future of computing and digital communication

localized internet and mobile cultures, practices, industries, and technologies

interrogations of the global, local, cosmopolitan, hybrid, or glocal in regard to new media

development strategies and new media infrastructures

multi-scalar digital divides

global/local perspectives on gaming cultures or game development

experiences of place through new media

new media networks and nodes

economies of import and export

Please send a 250-word abstract with a preliminary bibliography by September  7th to either Ben Aslinger (Bentley University, Waltham, MA, USA, baslinger@bentley.edu) or Germaine Halegoua (University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA, grhalegoua@gmail.com).  Our plan is for all 5000-word commissioned papers to be due by March 31, 2011.

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